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Happy PB&J Day! Kidlit, Peanut Butter and Fluffernutter

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Happy NATIONAL PEANUT BUTTER AND JELLY DAY!

National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day is celebrated annually on April 2nd.  This food holiday is a classic favorite of many.  The average American will have eaten over 2000 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches by the time they graduate from high school.

Even as an adult, on days when nothing else sounds good, a yummy PB&J sammy always hits the spot.

This holiday always reminds of me of the fun book from author Chris Robertson. I’ll Trade my Peanut-Butter Sandwich

The main character in this book is very clever as he’ll trade his peanut-butter sandwich for just about anything. The prose kept my children engaged and the illustrations are so inventive and downright funny. The ironic thing is that after all the trades he makes for “bigger and better things,” he realizes that he’s hungry and all he wants is his sandwich back!

When a boy trades his peanut-butter sandwich, it begins a series of increasingly absurd and outrageous trades, until he finally discovers an appreciation for the simple things in life.-Amazon

I’ll Trade My Peanut Butter Sandwich is a perfect read-aloud for children who love books like If You Give a Mouse a Cookie series. Perfect for ages five and younger because of the engaging illustrations and the short text. I really enjoyed this book and I would not trade the experience of reading this picture book for anything, not even a Peanut-Butter And jelly sandwich.

Just for fun, ask your family what they would “trade their peanut butter sandwich” for.

Kidlit, Peanut Butter and Fluffernutter

 Something To Do:

 The History of Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches aka PB&J Sandwiches

In the early 1900s and served in New York City’s finest tea rooms, peanut butter was considered a delicacy only for those who could afford it. It was often paired with such things as celery, watercress, cheese, or nasturtiums and served on toasted crackers. Eventually, a recipe for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches was published in Good Housekeeping Magazine and from there the lunch box staple was born. By the 1920’s the price of peanut butter declined so much that it could easily be found in every household in America. During World War II peanut butter and jelly were on the U.S. Soldiers military meal ration list.

Crazy Peanut Butter Combinations

Of course, we know that peanut butter can be eaten with jelly, but did you know there are a variety of other items that people eat with their peanut butter? My mother’s favorite sandwich was peanut butter and onions. It gave me chills just to watch her eat it.

Other famous peanut butter combinations are:

  • Peanut butter and banana sandwiches
  • Peanut butter & fried pickles
  • Peanut butter & pears
  • Peanut butter & Apples (with honey!)
  • Peanut butter & Honey
  • Peanut butter, & chocolate

Fluffernutter Much?

Then there is something called a Fluffernutter: You take peanut butter and marshmallow fluff and put it on bread. I know you are drooling with anticipation so here is The Ultimate PB& Marmalade Fluffernutter Sandwich Recipe!

The Ultimate Fluffernutter marmalade sandwich

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons chunky peanut butter
3 slices white bread
1 1/2 tablespoon orange marmalade
1 1/2 tablespoon marshmallow creme
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Directions:

Spread 1 Tbl. peanut butter on one slice of bread. Spread marmalade over top. Set aside. Spread 1 Tbl. peanut butter on another slice of bread, then place on top of marmalade, peanut butter side down.

Spread marshmallow creme on the exposed side of bread. Sprinkle cheese on top of marshmallow creme. Spread remaining peanut butter on the remaining slice of bread, then place on top of cheese, forming double-decker sandwich.

More Books from Chris Robertson


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